Revai, K. et al. (2007)
Incidence of Acute Otitis Media and Sinusitis Complicating Upper Respiratory Tract Infection: The Effect of Age
Pediatrics 119, 1408-1412

and

Kamper-Jorgensen, M. et al. (2006)
Population-Based Study of the Impact of Childcare Attendance on Hospitalizations for Acute Respiratory Infections
Pediatrics 118, 1439-1446

and

Nafstad, P. et al. (1999)
Day Care Centers and Respiratory Health
Pediatrics 103, 753-758

  • Infants and young children are very prone to catching colds and other upper respiratory tract infections.
  • These three studies carried out at different times and in different Western countries investigated the effect of the child care environment on the number of such infections contracted by pre-school children.
  • The studies all came to remarkably similar conclusions: that children cared for in group child care are significantly more at risk of both trivial and serious respiratory infections than those cared for at home.
  • Only small differences, if any, were noted between children who began group care after two years of age and those still cared for at home.
  • All studies concluded that risk of respiratory infections could be reduced if children were cared for at home until at least their first and optimally their second birthdays.